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Results for 'early intervention'

Results 11 - 19 of 19

Housing, prevention and early intervention at work: a summary of the evidence base

PORTEUS Jeremy
2011

This summary briefing explores the latest research and findings on the preventive aspects of both capital and revenue housing interventions in local care economies and the wider benefit realisation. In particular, it captures research that evidences the cost benefit of support for older and vulnerable adults with a long term condition in extra care housing as an alternative to residential care, preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and speeding up patient discharges. This evidence shows the care efficiencies that can be achieved and the potential for savings on the public purse. The paper concludes that that for prevention and early intervention to be effective a multi-dimensional approach is required, rewarding closer integration, offering incentives to encourage innovation and market development, and supporting investment in physical and social capital.

Building community-based support with older people: evidence from other research reports

OUTSIDE THE BOX
2015

This report, developed as a resource for community groups, draws on recent key reports, discussion papers and research studies to present evidence on creating and sustaining community-based support for older people, including those which older people lead. It provides definitions of terms and approaches used in community-based support; outlines the current the policy context in Scotland; and then provides an overview of the main findings on community capacity building, changes in public services and the impacts for older people. Points raised in the evidence include: older people who need extra support generally know what will make life better for them; community-based activities that focus on older people's wellbeing complement other services; and that providing community-based solutions and low-level support to older people before they need greater support can prevent or reduce the need for higher intensity services, bring benefits and better outcomes to the people involved. The final section summarises findings from the individual reports and research reviews identified. Although the policy and practice context for the report focuses on the situation in Scotland, most of the reports featured in the review come from the experience of services based in England.

Living Well for Longer: one year on

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
2015

Sets out progress to reduce premature avoidable mortality as set out in 'Living Well for Longer: National support for local action to reduce premature avoidable mortality.' The report argues that there has been improved prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of the five big killers: cancer, stroke, heart disease, lung disease, and liver disease. It also outlines the next steps for ongoing improvements across the system in reducing premature mortality, focusing on shared system leadership, accountability and transparency, ensuring prevention is front and centre, and improving outcomes for patients.

Local leadership, new approaches: how new ways of working are helping to improve the health of local communities

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2015

Examines how local authorities and health teams are working together to improve the health of local communities through prevention and early intervention. The report features seven case studies. Each one describes a particular programme or close partnership between a local authority and local public health or health care teams, often with the additional support of the voluntary sector. Each initiative focuses on a specific area and/or set of activities, including: integrating wellbeing; transforming the food culture in schools; helping people stay in their own homes; GPs linking people to other sources of support; healthy homes and housing conditions; promoting public health in schools; and active living.

Tracking your preventative spend: a step-by-step guide

WILKES Laura
2013

This toolkit helps councils to have a clearer understanding of how much of their budget is spent on prevention, how this contributes to the delivery of outcomes and what this means for increasing their activity towards early action programmes. It sets out the five steps to mapping and analysing spend: establishing a project sponsor and steering group; identifying and agreeing aims, objectives and scope of the project; understanding the outcome; mapping preventative services for the chosen outcome; and analysing and mapping budgets. It covers the practical steps taken and the outputs and challenges of each step. The toolkit draws on work carried out by the British Red Cross with the LGiU and Mears to support Camden Council to track their preventative spend against one of the council’s key outcomes from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework: to keep older people living independently for longer. The toolkit provides a useful resource for councils, health and wellbeing boards and clinical commissioning groups.

Investing in recovery: making the business case for effective interventions for people with schizophrenia and psychosis

KNAPP Martin, et al
2014

This study provides economic evidence to support the case for investing in effective, recovery-focused services for people with schizophrenia and psychosis. Drawing on a wide range of data, it sets out the evidence for the cost-effectiveness for a range of interventions and service. Those discussed are: Early Detection (ED) services; Early Intervention (EI) teams; Individual Placement and Support (IPS); Family therapy; Criminal justice liaison and diversion; Physical health promotion, including health behaviours; Supported housing; Crisis Resolution and Home Treatment (CRHT) teams; Crisis houses; Peer support; Self-management; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT); Anti-stigma and discrimination campaigns; Personal Budgets (PBs); and Welfare advice. For each intervention the report provides information on the context, the nature of the intervention, the evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and the policy and practice implications. The report finds evidence to suggest that all of the interventions contribute to recovery outcomes, reduced costs and/or better value for money. Examples of the savings incurred through particular interventions are also included. The study was undertaken by a team from the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU), at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Centre for Mental Health, and the Centre for the Economics of Mental and Physical Health (CEMPH) at King’s College London.

Guidance for commissioners of community specialist mental health services

JOINT COMMISSIONING PANEL FOR MENTAL HEALTH
2013

The Joint Commissioning Panel for Mental Health (JCP-MH) is a new collaboration co-chaired by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Royal College of Psychiatrists, which brings together leading organisations and individuals with an interest in commissioning for mental health and learning disabilities. This guide is about the commissioning of specialist community mental health services. It explores the role of Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), Assertive Outreach Teams and Early Intervention Teams among others. It has been written by a group of specialist community mental health care experts in consultation with patients and carers. Much is evidence-based, but ideas that are felt to be best practice by expert consensus are included.

Preventive home visits for mortality, morbidity, and institutionalization in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

MAYO-WILSON Evan, et al
2014

Background: Home visits for older adults aim to prevent cognitive and functional impairment, thus reducing institutionalisation and mortality. Visitors may provide information, investigate untreated problems, encourage medication compliance, and provide referrals to services. Methods and Findings: Data Sources: Ten databases including CENTRAL and Medline searched through December 2012. Study Selection: Randomised controlled trials enrolling community-dwelling persons without dementia aged over 65 years. Interventions included visits at home by a health or social care professional that were not related to hospital discharge. Two authors independently extracted data. Outcomes were pooled using random effects. Main Outcomes and Measures used were mortality, institutionalisation, hospitalisation, falls, injuries, physical functioning, cognitive functioning, quality of life, and psychiatric illness. Results: Sixty-four studies with 28642 participants were included. Home visits were not associated with absolute reductions in mortality at longest follow-up, but some programmes may have small relative effects. There was moderate quality evidence of no overall effect on the number of people institutionalised. There was high quality evidence for number of people who fell, which is consistent with no effect or a small effect, but there was no evidence that these interventions increased independent living. There was low and very low quality evidence of effects for quality of life and physical functioning respectively, but these may not be clinically important. Conclusions: Home visiting is not consistently associated with differences in mortality or independent living, and investigations of heterogeneity did not identify any programmes that are associated with consistent benefits. Due to poor reporting of intervention components and delivery, the authors cannot exclude the possibility that some programmes may be effective.

Early intervention and dementia care: innovation and impact

SEABROOKE Viniti, MILNE Alisoun
2014

Purpose: This study aims to systematically evaluate the impact and effectiveness of two early intervention services in NW Kent. Design/methodology/approach: Data were gathered via evaluation questionnaires for both projects; these included quantitative post-intervention data and qualitative comments. Data on referrals to secondary care and a specialist third sector organisation were also collected for the primary care project. Findings: Findings from the primary care project indicate that targeting a specific age cohort of patients can be effective in terms of: early identification of dementia-related concerns, the provision of support, appropriate referrals to secondary care, and increased referrals to a third sector dementia service. At the end of the project most practitioners felt they were better informed about dementia, more committed to facilitating early diagnosis, and had gained confidence in using a screening tool (the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition Test). Evidence from evaluating the Carers Group suggests that attendance helped members manage emotional difficulties, increased understanding of dementia, and enhanced coping skills. They also felt less isolated and knew how to access support services. Practical implications: The projects offer two models of intervention: how a proactive third sector agency can work with primary care professionals to enhance commitment to dementia case finding and the provision of group support to relatives of those in receipt of a recent dementia diagnosis. Originality/value: The study provides insights into early intervention in dementia care how to evaluate impact of effectiveness.

Results 11 - 19 of 19

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