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Results for 'loneliness'

Results 21 - 30 of 38

Ageing in the UK: trends and foresight: report 7

FLATTERS Paul, JOHNSON Tom, O'SHEA Ruairi
2015

Presents key information and data on the UK ageing population, including an analysis of current trends and the implications for the future. The report sets out the national picture, focusing on the demographic context, the state of income, pensions and retirement arrangements, and health issues. In addition, the report considers a range of aspects associated with old age, including: loneliness, dementia, older carers, volunteering, and digital inclusion. The report indicates that the population of the UK is set to increase significantly over the next decade, with much of this growth driven by an ageing population and sustained increases in the number of people over 65 years old. While the number of older people living in relative or absolute poverty has not increased since the start of the economic downturn, the minimum income standard for pensioners has risen and many of those on low incomes have trouble meeting everyday expenditure. The report suggests that higher dependency ratios will place huge demand on already strained public services, requiring greater support from the charitable sector. The impact of dementia will be a significant area of need in the future: even if incidence rates remain stable, the growth in the population of people over the age of 65 will see the number affected more than double from c.800,000 in 2012 to 2.2m in 2051. However, the report concludes that it is likely that incidence rates for dementia will increase as longevity continues to increase and diagnosis improves.

Measuring your impact on loneliness in later life

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS
2015

This guidance offers information and advice on choosing and using a scale to measure the impact of services and interventions on loneliness in older age. A scale is simply a way of numerically measuring an opinion or emotion, and is one way to gather evidence about the effectiveness of a service. Using a scale enables service providers to ask about loneliness in a structured way – and produces numbers that can help illustrate how much of a difference they are making. In this guidance four different scales are described and evaluated and their strengths and limitations discussed. These are: the Campaign to End Loneliness Measurement Tool; the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale; the UCLA Loneliness Scale; and the single-item ‘scale’. The paper explains how to use a chosen scale, focusing on sampling for a survey, gaining informed consent, reducing bias, data collection, asking open, follow-up questions, and keeping personal information confidential.

Tackling loneliness in older age: the role of the arts

CUTLER David
2012

This report looks at the scale and impact of loneliness among older people and argues that the arts are a powerful tool to tackle the problem. It suggests that older people need a broad range of opportunities and activities to help them maintain healthy social relationships. These can include care and befriending support, but just as important are opportunities that connect them to their communities, such as faith, learning, fitness, leisure and cultural activities. The arts are an effective way to tackle loneliness but can be overlooked by older people’s services. The report provides some practical actions for this activity to be increased and a list of resources. It contains an appended series of ten case studies drawn from some of the arts organisations currently funded by the Baring Foundation. These illustrate some of the many ways in which the arts can make a difference: in rural locations or in the inner city, in a residential care home, a community or an arts venue, through reinventing the tradition of the tea dance for the 21st century or in a major new festival.

What role for extra care housing in a socially isolated landscape?

KNEALE Dylan
2013

This report for the Housing Learning and Improvement Network explores the likely impact of housing with care in helping to limit social isolation and loneliness from being an integral part of the ageing experience. The report questions the ways in which living in extra care housing could reduce or lower the risk of social isolation, and how this could in turn translate to lower dependency on state services. The report also presents case studies that outline the mechanisms through which living in extra care housing reduces the risk of social isolation. It begins through reviewing current government standpoints on social isolation and loneliness.

Measuring national well-being: an analysis of social capital in the UK

SIEGLER Veronique
2015

This article provides a baseline analysis of social capital in the UK, using the latest available data. The data are based on 25 headline measures proposed by the Office for National Statistics, which cover four key aspects of social capital: personal relationships, social network support, civic engagement and trust and cooperative norms. Key findings include: around 1 in 10 people in the UK reported feeling lonely all, most, or more than half of the time in 2011/12 and just over a third said that they wish they could spend more time with their family and have more social contact. Nearly 1 in 5 people reported looking after or giving special help to someone sick, disabled or elderly and nearly a fifth of people had given unpaid help or worked as a volunteer in a local, national or international organisation or charity in the last 12 months in 2012/13. Half of people reported being very or quite interested in politics and around two-thirds thought people in their neighbourhood could be trusted. Nearly three-quarters of people felt people in their neighbourhood get along with each other and are willing to help each other.

Hidden citizens: how can we identify the most lonely older adults?

GOODMAN Anna, SWIFT Hannah J., ADAMS Adrian
2015

This report summarises the findings from the Hidden Citizens project, providing insights regarding the pathways into and out of loneliness and examples of how interventions and services identify the loneliest older adults. The project was conducted in two parts. First, a meta-review was conducted to explore the features of loneliness, its underlying mechanisms and how intervention programs identify and recruit their participants. The findings of the meta-review informed the second part of the project in which a number of interviews and focus groups with older people, service commissioners, service organisation CEO’s, managers and practitioners were conducted. This report also contains specific recommendations for policy makers, service providers and service commissioners on how to improve services and service provision, and identifies avenues for future research to explore. It shows that the experience of loneliness is likely to be a culmination of one or more factors, or set of circumstances, which include: membership of different social groups; personality; psychological response; environmental factors; life events, traumas and transitions; and personal circumstances. The report sets out recommendations considering ways to identify people experiencing loneliness across three different levels: the population, organisational and individual level.

LinkAge Bristol

Bristol City Council

LinkAge is a local charity that works with people aged 55 and over and local communities to facilitate inspiring social activities that enrich lives, reduce isolation and loneliness and promote active participation and positive ageing. LinkAge works through community hubs, each of which has a local Advisory Group of people aged over 55 who decide on what activities to develop, informed by feedback from the wider community at open days and wellbeing days where people can contribute their ideas and suggestions. LinkAge will provide support in getting new groups off the ground, negotiatingdeals on venues etc, but aims for activities to become self-sustaining with participants taking on organisation and contributing to costs.

The Carers Centre for Brighton and Hove – Male Carers Support Group

Brighton & Hove City Council

A twice-monthly group designed to support male adults in Brighton and Home who are caring for a partner, relative or friend, through coffee mornings and self-determined social activities, provided free of charge. One-to-one support is also provided by the Carers’ Centre and all activities are organised to fit around caring responsibilities and accessibility needs.

Promising approaches: to reducing loneliness and isolation in later life

JOPLING Kate
2015

This report raises concerns that loneliness and social isolation among older people is becoming a serious public health issue. It draws on the views of experts and research evidence to set out a new framework for understanding and tackling loneliness in older people. The approach is based around three key challenges: reaching individuals; understanding the specific circumstances of an individual's loneliness; and supporting individuals to take up services that would help. Sections of the report cover: the foundation services (reaching, understanding and supporting individuals); the types of intervention that are most likely to meet older people's need for social contact; how technology and transport can facilitate social connection; and 'structural enablers' focusing on how services are delivered (i.e., at neighbourhood level, community development, volunteering, and age positive approaches). It also highlights areas where a greater understanding of how to address loneliness within the older community is needed: within care settings; in black and minority ethnic groups; and with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans older people. Case studies are used throughout to demonstrate the variety of solutions needed to address a very personal and individual problem. Includes specific recommendations for service providers, commissioners and those involved with search.

Preventing loneliness and social isolation in older people

COLLINS Emma
2014

This Insight looks specifically at the prevention of isolation and loneliness amongst older people, with a particular focus on what practitioners in the fields of health and social care should bear in mind when working to tackle this important and growing issue. It highlights the findings from past research and and evidence about what works, summarises the key characteristics of successful interventions, looks at how they relate to the prevention agenda, and the particular role health and social care professionals can play.

Results 21 - 30 of 38

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