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Results for 'older people'

Results 71 - 80 of 141

Co-producing approaches to the management of dementia through social prescribing

BAKER Keith, IRVING Adele
2015

A promising approach to the management of dementia is ‘social prescribing’. Social prescribing is a form of ‘co-production’ that involves linking patients with non-clinical activities, typically delivered by voluntary and community groups, in an effort to improve their sense of well-being. The success of social prescribing depends upon the ability of boundary-spanning individuals within service delivery organisations to develop referral pathways and collaborative relationships through ‘networks’. This article examines the operation of a pilot social prescribing programme in the North East of England, targeted at older people with early onset dementia and depression, at risk of social isolation. It is argued that the scheme was not sustained, in part, because the institutional logics that governed the actions of key boundary-spanning individuals militated against the collaboration necessary to support co-production.

Fit for frailty: part 2: developing, commissioning and managing services for people living with frailty in community settings

BRITISH GERIATRICS SOCIETY, ROYAL COLLEGE OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS
2015

Provides advice and guidance on the development, commissioning and management of services for people living with frailty in community settings. The first section introduces the concept of frailty and sets out the rationale for developing frailty services. The second section explores the essential characteristics of a good service. The third section considers the issue of performance and outcome measures for frailty services. The appendix to the report includes eight case studies of services which are operating in different parts of the UK. The audience for this guidance comprises GPs, geriatricians, health service managers, social service managers and commissioners of services. It is a companion report to an earlier BGS publication, Fit for Frailty Part 1 which provided advice and guidance on the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings.

Fit for frailty: consensus best practice guidance for the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings

TURNER Gillian
2014

The first of a two-part guidance on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. This guide has been produced in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and Age UK and aims to be an invaluable tool for social workers, ambulance crews, carers, GPs, nurses and others working with older people in the community. The guidance will help them to recognise the condition of frailty and to increase understanding of the strategies available for managing it. In the guidelines, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for all those working with older people to be aware of, and assess for frailty. It dispels the myth that all older people are frail and that frailty is an inevitable part of age. It also highlights the fact that frailty is not static. Like other long term conditions it can fluctuate in severity.

Safe and Well

Blackburn with Darwen Borough Council

Safe and Well is the Assistive Technology Programme with which Blackburn and Darwen Borough Council aims to improve the outcomes for its citizens, supporting them to live independently at home, while also reducing its social care costs. It has consisted of 3 pilot projects to date, working with adults with learning and physical disabilities; nursing and residential homes and early intervention with adults not yet eligible for funded social care. Blackburn has moved from supporting 60 people to over 1900 people with assistive technologies.

Are housing associations ready for an ageing population?

WHEATLEY Martin
2015

The report addresses the future housing needs of older people and the role of housing associations in providing supported accommodation and care. It examines these challenges over the medium term investment horizon to the 2030's. In particular, it explores what the older population will be like at that time, what housing association boards should be thinking about now, and what the sector and government need to do to realise the opportunities and manage the risks associated with older people's housing. The report also considers how the links between housing, health and social care can be improved, and asks if housing providers understand the expectations and aspirations of their tenants as they grow older. The report is based on published official statistics, a survey of social landlords, a round table discussion with social landlord executives and a literature review. The findings suggest that housing associations need to understand their older customers better, be clear about the implications of population ageing for their existing stock and new build housing, and to develop services which emphasise the promotion of personal, social and economic wellbeing.

Measuring your impact on loneliness in later life

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS
2015

This guidance offers information and advice on choosing and using a scale to measure the impact of services and interventions on loneliness in older age. A scale is simply a way of numerically measuring an opinion or emotion, and is one way to gather evidence about the effectiveness of a service. Using a scale enables service providers to ask about loneliness in a structured way – and produces numbers that can help illustrate how much of a difference they are making. In this guidance four different scales are described and evaluated and their strengths and limitations discussed. These are: the Campaign to End Loneliness Measurement Tool; the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale; the UCLA Loneliness Scale; and the single-item ‘scale’. The paper explains how to use a chosen scale, focusing on sampling for a survey, gaining informed consent, reducing bias, data collection, asking open, follow-up questions, and keeping personal information confidential.

Building community-based support with older people: evidence from other research reports

OUTSIDE THE BOX
2015

This report, developed as a resource for community groups, draws on recent key reports, discussion papers and research studies to present evidence on creating and sustaining community-based support for older people, including those which older people lead. It provides definitions of terms and approaches used in community-based support; outlines the current the policy context in Scotland; and then provides an overview of the main findings on community capacity building, changes in public services and the impacts for older people. Points raised in the evidence include: older people who need extra support generally know what will make life better for them; community-based activities that focus on older people's wellbeing complement other services; and that providing community-based solutions and low-level support to older people before they need greater support can prevent or reduce the need for higher intensity services, bring benefits and better outcomes to the people involved. The final section summarises findings from the individual reports and research reviews identified. Although the policy and practice context for the report focuses on the situation in Scotland, most of the reports featured in the review come from the experience of services based in England.

Tackling loneliness in older age: the role of the arts

CUTLER David
2012

This report looks at the scale and impact of loneliness among older people and argues that the arts are a powerful tool to tackle the problem. It suggests that older people need a broad range of opportunities and activities to help them maintain healthy social relationships. These can include care and befriending support, but just as important are opportunities that connect them to their communities, such as faith, learning, fitness, leisure and cultural activities. The arts are an effective way to tackle loneliness but can be overlooked by older people’s services. The report provides some practical actions for this activity to be increased and a list of resources. It contains an appended series of ten case studies drawn from some of the arts organisations currently funded by the Baring Foundation. These illustrate some of the many ways in which the arts can make a difference: in rural locations or in the inner city, in a residential care home, a community or an arts venue, through reinventing the tradition of the tea dance for the 21st century or in a major new festival.

COMODAL: COnsumer MODels for Assisted Living: project summary and findings

CONSUMER MODELS FOR ASSISTED LIVING
2015

An evaluation of the 3 year COMODAL (Consumer Models for Assisted Living) project, funded by the Technology Strategy Board, which aims to support the development of a consumer market for electronic assisted living technologies (eALT). The project focuses on those people aged 50-70 who are approaching retirement and older age to gain an in-depth understanding of the barriers to market development and create consumer led business models developed through collaboration with consumers, industry and the third sector. The report focuses on five key strands of the projects: understanding consumer needs; developing solutions and consumer led business models for eALT; development of industry support system for practical implementation of consumer led business models; development of consumer insights guide for industry; and impact, dissemination and exploitation. The report reveals there is a disconnect between industry’s perceptions of what consumers are looking for in the eALT market and that existing businesses in this sector are on the whole set up to serve statutory services rather than consumers. The top three factors that encourage consumers to buy are: believing that a product would really make a difference, a feeling that costs are affordable and worth it, and a belief that the product would make life safer at home.

Improving later life: vulnerability and resilience in older people

AGE UK
2015

A summary of the available evidence regarding the maintenance of resilience in older people, examining some of the factors and experiences that make older people more susceptible to the risk of adverse outcomes and exploring strategies to help build resilience in later life. The key topics covered are: social engagement; resources, including financial resources, housing and age-friendly neighbourhoods; health and disability; cognitive and mental health; and carers. The paper makes a number of recommendations, including: adopt a holistic view of all kinds of vulnerability in later life as the main focus rather concentrating on parts of the problem or parts of the body; make better use of the research evidence to identify problems earlier and to target resources; concentrate more on combating the effects of neighbourhood deprivation; work towards providing an age-friendly environment; facilitate home adaptations, aids and a better range of housing options; and root out ageism among professionals and society in general.

Results 71 - 80 of 141

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