Induction Standards for Northern Ireland

Standard 1: Understand the principles of care: The values

Values include a range of concepts such as individuality, choice, privacy, independence, dignity, respect and partnership. Here we will look at two values: equality and inclusion. This means respecting that everyone is different and making sure they are involved in their care.

Equality and inclusion

Equality and inclusion relate to areas such as race, gender, disability, age, sexual orientation and religious beliefs. People have the same right to receive care whatever their background or beliefs. A care worker needs not only to be aware of this but also to be active in promoting it in their practice. Equality and inclusion apply not only to the people you support but also your work colleagues. They are two of the essential values which underpin social care.

If you are employed directly to support someone in their own home, how do you think equality and inclusion applies to you?

Every care worker needs to understand what this means for them personally. Often it will mean reflecting on their own views and behaviour. Supervision can help with this. Equality and inclusion are a key part of social care. The Equality Commission for Northern Ireland (ECNI) is the government body set up to oversee this area and states:

‘Equality requires each of us to respect the rights of those who are different from ourselves... it is important to take into account that equality in health and social care recognises that different people have different requirements.’

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • What is meant by discrimination?
  • Think of one person you care for. Are there things you can do to make sure they are treated equally and included?
  • Why do you think it is important that a care worker needs to know about differences in cultures?

Did you know?

  • Equality and inclusion are basic human rights – not a special category of behaviour. In Northern Ireland there is a range of legislation which allows legal action to be taken in cases of discrimination.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Access information, advice and support about equality and inclusion

There are various ways of obtaining information on diversity, equality and inclusion. You can access government websites that list all the current legislation in place to protect the rights of individuals. You can obtain leaflets to give to your service users informing them of their rights. You can contact certain groups, such as Age NI, who can supply materials to hand out to your service users on discrimination, equality and other issues. Your local library and Citizens’ Advice Bureau will also have some leaflets. You may need such information to help an individual who is seeking advice on a particular subject.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • York College has devised this Challenge Yourself quiz. See how well you can do.
  • Read your employer’s policy again. Do you understand it more clearly now?

Did you know?

  • Equality and inclusion are extremely important in a successful care business.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Promoting dignity and individuality

A care worker needs to be able to support people in a way that maintains their dignity and self-esteem. Each person is an individual and needs to be treated as such. This can often be a challenge to care and support workers.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

Did you know?

  • If you don’t respect people’s dignity and treat everyone equally, you are not really seeing them as people in their own right.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.

Supporting active participation

People who use services have a right to be seen as individuals with different preferences, skills and abilities. Respecting this basic right means involving them in the way their care and support is delivered. It is the key in moving from ‘doing to’ to ‘doing with’. This can happen informally with individuals or in more formal settings, such as residents’ meetings or service user groups.

Look at the following resources:

Check your understanding

  • When you have watched the SCIE video, write down some of the key terms relating to active participation in care.
  • Think about the organisation you work for. Are people participating in their care? Make a list of the things that mean they are involved and a list of what might be improved.

Did you know?

  • The more people are involved in their care, the more positive will be their experience.

Record what you have learned

  • Your organisation may have a Learning Record Form. If so, use that to write down what you have learned and any questions you might have. Otherwise you can use our Learning Record Form.