COVID-19 resources

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Delivering good practice initial assessments of family and friends carers in the context of Covid-19. An appendix to the Initial family and friends care assessment: a good practice guide

Family Rights Group

The Initial Family and Friends Care Assessment: A good practice guide is designed to be used by local authorities to support decision making as to whether a family member or friend might be a potentially realistic option to be a carer for a child who cannot live safely with their parents. It sets out the key issues to be addressed in the very early stages of identifying potential carers. However, delivering good practice in the current circumstances is challenging in several ways: social workers contact with, and assessments of, potential carers may need to be through phone and virtual means; potential carers may be having to cope with a range of challenges resulting from Covid-19 as well as the impact of the crisis in their family that has resulted in a child or children needing long term care from a family member; family members who might be suitable may not be in a position to offer immediate care because of the health risks they are dealing with; family members may be dealing with a number of serious questions about their future because of the broad uncertainties resulting from the pandemic. The purpose of this short document is to assist practitioners in these unique circumstances to produce a robust and balanced assessment which is appropriately child and family centred and which can support sound decision-making.

Last updated on hub: 18 January 2021

The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

Children and Society

The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. In this discussion paper, we examine the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. We write from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. We discuss how these issues can be dealt with and set out potential solutions as we emerge from this global crisis.

Last updated on hub: 16 January 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic and long-term care: what can we learn from the first wave about how to protect care homes?

Eurohealth

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted and exacerbated pre-existing problems in the long-term care sector. Based on examples collected from the COVID-19 Health System Response Monitor (HSRM) and the International Long-term care Policy Network (LTCcovid), this article aims to take stock of what countries have done to support care homes in response to COVID-19. By learning from the measures taken during the first wave, governments and the sector itself have an opportunity to put the sector on a stronger footing from which to strengthen long-term care systems.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

Reflections on practice during a pandemic: how do we continue to ensure effective communication during the COVID‐19 pandemic?

Child Abuse Review

Personal reflection of a social worker who began a role in the Effective Child Protection Project as a practice mentor to social workers across the Children and Families Service in Gwynedd, in April 2019. This report considers the authors reflections on how communication has been affected in social work due to the pandemic.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

New development: managing the Covid-19 pandemic – from a hospital-centred model of care to a community co-production approach

Public Money and Management

Covid-19 is not only a crisis of intensive care but a social and humanitarian crisis. Until mass vaccination is undertaken, control of contagion will rely on responsible behaviour by citizens. Strategies for fighting Covid-19 in different regions of Italy have shown that an area-specific approach, not just hospital-focused, pays off. This article proposes a community co-production approach, in the light of discussions with politicians and key health decision-makers and actors. Preventing the spread of Covid-19 can mainly be achieved by social, not medical, means. Decision-makers should be aware that a strategy of relying only on the acute health system, placing a high burden on community-based public services, without any systematic attempt to co-ordinate or support the expansion of these services, is likely to fail. This article explains the benefits of a community co-production strategy.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

Transformation of a recreational youth group into community service group during the COVID-19 pandemic

Social Work with Groups

This narrative is based on the solidarity of a recreational youth group during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Note: Youth refers to older adolescents and young adults, 17–28). The narrative describes the journey and transformation of the youth group from playing cricket to the engagement in community service during the lockdown period. This paper also presents how the presence of the group shifted from physical to a digital platform, and the focus turned from recreation to social support; with that change in the focus, how a small group of youths turned into a larger group to mobilize and utilize resources for community service during the crisis time.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

Group work over a digital platform: understanding middle-class struggle in pandemic

Social Work with Groups

This narrative is about how a WhatsApp friendship group was turned into a process reminiscent of social group work and how it became a promising practice for its group members during the coronavirus pandemic. The narrative portrays the struggles of middle-class families of Indian society in this crisis situation and how some of their issues were addressed using the digital platform in a group context.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

Children and COVID19: understanding impact on the growth trajectory of an evolving generation

Children and Youth Services Review

The COVID19 pandemic has forced the world to be closed in a shell. It has affected large population worldwide, but studies regarding its effect on children very limited. The majority of the children, who may not be able to grasp the entire emergency, are at a bigger risk with other problems lurking behind the attack of SARS-CoV-2 virus. The risk of infection in children was 1.3%, 1.5%, and 1.7% of total confirmed COVID-19 cases in China, Italy and United States respectively which is less compared to 2003 epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), when 5–7% of the positive cases were children, with no deaths reported while another recent multinational multicentric study from Europe which included 582 PCR (polymerase chain reaction) confirmed children of 0–18 year of age, provide deeper and generalize incite about clinical effects of COVID19 infection in children. According to this study 25% children have some pre-existing illness and 8% required ICU (intensive care unit) admission with 0.69% case fatality among all infected children. Common risk factor for serious illness as per this study are younger age, male sex and pre-existing underlying chronic medical condition. However, we need to be more concerned about possible implications of indirect and parallel psychosocial and mental health damage due to closure of schools, being in confinement and lack of peer interaction due to COVID19 related lockdown and other containment measures. The effects can range from mood swings, depression, anxiety symptoms to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, while no meaningful impact on COVID19 related mortality reduction is evident with school closure measures. The objective of this paper is to look at both the positive & negative effects in children due to COVID19 related indirect effects following lockdown and other containment measures. There is a need to gear up in advance with psychological strategies to deal with it post the pandemic by involving all stakeholders (parents, teachers, paediatricians, psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric social workers, counsellors), proposing an integrated approach to help the children to overcome the pandemic aftermath.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

The impact of the COVID‐19 pandemic on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people

Children and Society

The COVID‐19 pandemic has had an enormous impact across the world. This discussion paper examines the effect that lockdown has had on the mental health and well‐being of children and young people. This paper is from a UK perspective in the light of the international evidence. Many of the discussion points raised resonate globally. This paper discusses how these issues can be dealt with and set out potential solutions as we emerge from this global crisis.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021

Creating solace and hope during COVID-19: an innovative Internet-based social work intervention

International Social Work

During megacity lockdown, a team of social work practitioners and researchers in Beijing developed a rapid, innovative, Internet-based intervention that provided social-emotional support for participating families through indoor micro-gardening. As COVID-19 continues to restrict in-person interactions and traditional social activities, this type of online social-emotional support and community building should become a major social work method for crisis intervention and service provision.

Last updated on hub: 15 January 2021